Managing the Menace – Mosquito Larva 

Managing the Menace – Mosquito Larva

Residential Remodel Service in San Deigo
Source: Flickr

 
The females lay her eggs in the water. The mosquito larva lives in the water, feeding on microorganisms that float on the surface. The mosquito larva, breathing through an air tube or siphon, or directly through a hole in its abdomen, it filters organic material through its mouthparts, and some even turning cannibalistic over the growth period. Capable of swimming, and diving down from the surface when disturbed, the mosquito larva will then shed its skin or ‘molt’ several times over turning into an adult… The mosquito larva, “blood-worms” or “wrigglers” growing in the water… EEEWWWW… And it’s not just disgusting, it’s potentially menacing. It’s good that we can contain it.
To control mosquitoes, mosquito larva is the target – “Source-Reduction”. What else is the most efficient way of controlling mosquitoes than eliminating their large breeding sites? Swamps or slowly moving streams or ditches harboring the creepy culprits must be hunted down and impounded. Through community-wide effort, the stagnant waters could also be larvicided – larvicides targeting the immature wrigglers near lake, stream or ditch shorelines. The stomach toxins, contact larvicides, surface agents, natural agents and insect growth regulators IGR shall do the job. If not then the LarvaSonic, an acoustic larvicide system transmitting sound-energy into the water at resonant frequencies so the mosquito larva air bladders instantly ruptures the internal tissue and causes death.
Or you yourself could have a hand on the job. Prevent the propagation of mosquito larva. Endeavor to eliminate and avoid having accumulated water in flowerpot saucers or in pet dishes for more than 2-days. Make it a regular habit (at least once/week) change the water in birdbaths and toy pools, or integrate mosquito predator minnows in your ornamental pools. Or treat waters with biorational larvicides containing mosquito dunk BTI or insect growth regulator IGR. Destroy tin cans, old tires, buckets, unused plastic swimming-pools or other containers collecting and holding mosquito-honing water. Clean debris from rain-gutters. Remove any standing water under/around structures or on flat roofs. Check around and repair faucets and air-conditioner units to eliminate puddles. Check for trapped water in plastic or canvas tarps used to cover boats, pools, etc. Drain swampy areas or water- gathering sites like tree holes, ditches, or stumps; better yet also fill them with mortar. Irrigate lawns and gardens carefully to prevent water from standing for days. Arrange the tarp to drain water. Make sure to rid of cisterns, cesspools, or septic tank leakage. Remove standing water in animal-furrows. Also check-out do-it-yourself or construction shops for tips on proper backfilling/grading to prevent drainage problems. If ditches do not flow and contain stagnant water for one week or longer, report such conditions to a Mosquito Control or Public Health Office.